http://www.greenpeace.org.ar

Greenpeace was born in 1971 in an almost spontaneous. A Canadian group of antinuclear activists who had taken refuge in Canada for not participating in the Vietnam War, formed a small organization called "Do not Make a Wave" ( "Do not make a wave"). This group was protesting against nuclear testing that the United States took place in the Amchitka Islands (Alaska), northern Canada. The group's name referred to the possibility that, to be a seismically unstable area, the nuclear tests conducted there could cause a tsunami. After carrying out other initiatives, decided to rent an old fishing vessel, the "Phyllis Cormack" and travel with him to the area should take place nuclear testing, to prevent his physical presence that the bomb was detonated. For this trip, renamed the ship with a new name that summed up the philosophy of the group Greenpeace. While in America's internal conflicts weakened to Greenpeace, McTaggart, still concentrated in their struggle against French nuclear testing in the Pacific, founded Greenpeace in Europe. The first sections were opened in the UK and France. Holland soon joined. The formation of Greenpeace in the old continent was a decisive force that enabled unite all groups in the world under that name and create, in 1978, Greenpeace International, unifying the areas of campaign and how to act. Since then, the organization has evolved without too much upheaval.These have been years of experiences, successes and errors, in which the internal structure and operation have been adapted to the pace of growth of the organization, geographic expansion and the expansion of the campaign issues addressed. Greenpeace has become the largest organization in the world with very important achievements to its credit and a fleet of ships and activists who are willing to give his life for the planet. Greenpeace Argentina Greenpeace's first office opened in a developing country, Greenpeace Argentina, had to face new challenges. The Buenos Aires office was officially opened on 1 April 1987 (although he had begun work in February 1986), when a group of volunteers started the paperwork to register Greenpeace as a nonprofit foundation. "We want peace, and want it to be true," said one crew member to the press before leaving Vancouver (Canada) to go to Amchitka, a place of great ecological value for its important seabird colonies within it. The trip was a disaster: the improvised crew spent most of the time dizzy and internal disputes were common in domestic affairs. Finally, the error of not paying enough attention to the legal paperwork provided an opportunity for the U.S. Coast Guard to stop the boat when he was about to reach its destination, based on the failure of some minor formalities that the crew had overlooked. The nuclear test but could not prevent, but fortunately there was no tsunami. As direct action, the expedition to Amchitka was a failure. However, as campaign strategy, proved an extraordinary success.Two journalists who were aboard the "Phyllis Cormack" radioed their employers all the details of the trip and the Canadian public, already motivated against American nuclear tests conducted with his country, found in the journey Greenpeace a catalyst for their protest. Someone was doing something to stop testing atómicas.Decenas of thousands of protesters blocked for days at the border between Canada and the United States, and the latter was forced to announce that this was the last nuclear explosion would take place in the area. Amchitka is an ornithological reserve since. With this trip Greenpeace learned many lessons that has been applied and developed since then. In the years that followed, various independent groups with no connection to each other, took the name of Greenpeace USA, New Zealand and Australia.By then, David McTaggart, a former Canadian businessman, had become a sailor maverick who rebelled against the French government's decision to rein in international waters 400 miles around the Moruroa Atoll (Pacific) to carry out its nuclear tests. McTaggart made contact with the small group of Greenpeace activists in New Zealand and offered his yacht, the Vega, to travel to the forbidden zone and try to prevent nuclear tests scheduled for 1972 and 1973. This was the beginning of the Greenpeace campaign against French nuclear activities in the Pacific. David McTaggart became a cornerstone of the organization, and was chairman of Greenpeace International since the early 80s until 1991. In a country where much of the population was and still is struggling to make ends meet, it was important to define priorities and campaigns that were not branded as too idealistic.Accordingly, it chose the toxic waste problem as the centerpiece, because it directly affects the quality of life for almost all Argentines. The first step was to launch an extensive research program. The information gathered allowed us to establish the main objectives: to achieve a ban on the production, importation, sale and use of the "Dirty Dozen" (12 chemicals used in pesticides and harmful to health) and push for legislation that would put a stop hazardous discharges. On another front, the Director of the antinuclear campaign set the goal to block the construction of the nuclear shell Gastre, located in the province of Chubut, Patagonia Argentina. Greenpeace Argentina hopes to achieve their ends through political pressure to ban the import of nuclear waste (in Gastre no waste would be stored only Argentina but also in other countries), and also works to alert public opinion about the risks of the dump nuclear. No one can say that in the early years of collaboration between different groups of Greenpeace was excellent. The relationship between them was rather controversial, the discussion centered on what was the rightful owner of the group name. Things got worse when, after 1974, a section of Greenpeace in the U.S.and Canada decided to open the campaign against commercial whaling, and later in 1976 against the slaughter of baby seals in Newfoundland (Newfoundland, Canada). The anti-nuclear fraction considered the defense of marine mammals as an issue "soft" to be left to other groups. He almost produced a schism. Today Greenpeace Argentina has not only these goals but also a long history in the context of environmental protection. While in America's internal conflicts weakened to Greenpeace, McTaggart, still concentrated in their struggle against French nuclear testing in the Pacific, founded Greenpeace in Europe. The first sections were opened in the UK and France. Holland soon joined. The formation of Greenpeace in the old continent was a decisive force that enabled unite all groups in the world under that name and create, in 1978, Greenpeace International, unifying the areas of campaign and how to act. Since then, the organization has evolved without too much upheaval.These have been years of experiences, successes and errors, in which the internal structure and operation have been adapted to the pace of growth of the organization, geographic expansion and the expansion of the campaign issues addressed. Greenpeace has become the largest organization in the world with very important achievements to its credit and a fleet of ships and activists who are willing to give his life for the planet. Greenpeace Argentina Greenpeace's first office opened in a developing country, Greenpeace Argentina, had to face new challenges. The Buenos Aires office was officially opened on 1 April 1987 (although he had begun work in February 1986), when a group of volunteers started the paperwork to register Greenpeace as a nonprofit foundation. In a country where much of the population was and still is struggling to make ends meet, it was important to define priorities and campaigns that were not branded as too idealistic.Accordingly, it chose the toxic waste problem as the centerpiece, because it directly affects the quality of life for almost all Argentines. The first step was to launch an extensive research program. The information gathered allowed us to establish the main objectives: to achieve a ban on the production, importation, sale and use of the "Dirty Dozen" (12 chemicals used in pesticides and harmful to health) and push for legislation that would put a stop hazardous discharges. On another front, the Director of the antinuclear campaign set the goal to block the construction of the nuclear shell Gastre, located in the province of Chubut, Patagonia Argentina. Greenpeace Argentina hopes to achieve their ends through political pressure to ban the import of nuclear waste (in Gastre no waste would be stored only Argentina but also in other countries), and also works to alert public opinion about the risks of the dump nuclear. Today Greenpeace Argentina has not only these goals but also a long history in the context of environmental protection.
d.write('')})();